Tips For Preventing High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is related to many diseases including heart disease, stroke, vascular dementia and chronic kidney disease. High blood pressure also known as Hypertension is especially dangerous since it often gives no warning signs or symptoms. However, you can find out if you have high blood pressure by having a regular check up routine. If it is higher than the normal range, you can take steps to lower it. Just as important, if your blood pressure is normal, you can learn how to keep it from rising.

What is Hypertension?
In simple terms, blood pressure is the amount of force exerted against the walls of the arteries as blood flows within them. However, in Hypertension, the walls of the arteries receive too much pressure repeatedly. To confirm the diagnosis of hypertension, the pressure needs to be chronically elevated for a sustainable period.

What are the symptoms?
Hypertension is known to be a ‘Silent Killer’ with no specific symptoms or signs. The only way you get to know that you are suffering from it is getting it measured on regular basis. The symptoms listed below are more general in nature; however, if you experience too many of them repeatedly, you should visit a Blood pressure check service center.

Headache – usually, this will last for several days.

Nausea – a sensation of unease and discomfort in the stomach with an urge to vomit.

Vomiting – less common than just nausea.

Dizziness – Lightheadedness, unsteadiness, and vertigo.

Blurred or double vision (diplopia).

Epistaxis – nosebleeds.

Palpitations – disagreeable sensations of irregular and forceful beating of the heart.

Dyspnea – breathlessness, shortness of breath.

Follow these simple tips for a healthy blood pressure:

Adopt a Healthy Diet

Reducing the salt intake in your food and eating plenty of fruits and vegetables is highly recommended. Salt directly affects your blood pressure. Adapting to a low-fat diet that includes lots of fibre – such as wholegrain rice, bread and plenty of fruit and vegetables also helps reduce blood pressure. Aim to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables every day. Visit your private doctor at any clinic of your choice and ask for a customised diet chart. A vast options for private clinics like IPSA Medical Clinic are available in London.

Cut on the alcohol intake

Regularly drinking alcohol above recommended limits can raise your blood pressure over time. Men and women are advised not to drink more than 14 units a week regularly.

Shed those extra pounds

Being overweight forces your heart to work harder to pump blood around your body, which can raise your blood pressure.
If you do need to reduce some weight, implementing it will make a big difference to your blood pressure and overall health.

Be active

Being physically active and practising regular exercise helps lower blood pressure by keeping your heart and blood vessels in good condition. It also helps you lose weight, which in turn will also help lower your blood pressure. Adults should do at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity such as cycling or fast walking every week.
Physical activity can include anything from sport to walking and gardening.

Quit smoking

Smoking doesn’t directly cause high blood pressure, but it puts you at much greater risk of a heart attack and stroke.
Smoking, like high blood pressure, will harden the arteries thus making it narrow. If you smoke and have high blood pressure, your arteries will narrow much more quickly, and your risk of heart or lung disease in the future is dramatically increased.